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Home 17 November 2019
Culture Traditional forms of Art - Professions Wood sculpture Wood sculpture of Metsovo Wood sculptured works Epirus Metsovo

Throne, Church of Aghios Athanasios at Botonosion (1969)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Despotic Throne, Church of Aghios Nikolaos at Kepoi of Zagorion (1854-1860)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Despotic Throne with details, Church of Aghia Paraskevi at Metsovo (1750-60)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Despotic Throne with details, Church of Aghia Paraskevi at Metsovo (1750-60)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Despotic Throne with details, Church of Aghia Paraskevi at Metsovo (1750-60)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Cover for the Despotic Throne, Church of Aghios Nikolaos at Kepoi of Zagorion (1854-1860)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Despotic Throne, base and detail, Church for the Repose of the Virgin Mary at Chrysobitsa (1780)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Despotic Throne, cover and back, Church for the Repose of the Virgin Mary at Chrysobitsa (1780)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Cover for the Despotic Throne, Church of Aghioi Apostoloi at Metsovo (1880-1890)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)
Base for the Despotic Throne, Church of Aghioi Apostoloi at Metsovo (1880-1890)
(Photo: Triantaphyllos Sioulis)

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Geographic map of Ioannina Prefecture with the works of Metsovo and Tournovo wood sculptors
Geographic map of Ioannina Prefecture with the works of Metsovo and Tournovo wood sculptors

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Wood sculptured works
LOCATION
Epirus
Metsovo
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14/11/2006
Despotic thrones

Triantaphyllos Sioulis

© Prefecture of Ioannina
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During the years of the Turkish occupation, because it was not permitted to construct new and large churches, the opposite in fact occurred since the demolition of churches were common at least in the early years, the thrones were absent from most churches.
From the 17th century and mainly afterwards, when some permits were slowly being granted for repairs to old and the construction of new churches, which were mainly small, we see together with the iconostases, the pulpits and the Despotic thrones making their appearance in the Epirus area.
These are magnificent and were distinguished between them in accordance with their structure. In some the cover has been supported upon the rear single piece columns and upon the two front small pillars, whilst in others the front small pillars were absent and the side supports for the cover arched in a bow shape towards the front. It is common in both cases for the cover to be of a square or a hexagonal or an octagonal cross section with a small dome that has been supported with a polyhedron prism upon the cover’s base.
It is worth noting what has been observed at some thrones, such as for example at the church of Aghia Paraskevi at Metsovo, where the rear section of the throne has been suitably adapted into an icon stand. This was possibly due to the fact that they wanted to display more than one of the honoured saints in the two natures and the three nature churches, since this is common practice in those churches. It is possible that this practice has endured from the period of the Turkish occupation when it was not permitted to erect new churches in the place of those that had been demolished or that had been destroyed due to desertion, with the result being that the honour paid to the saints of those churches being transferred to other churches, at adjoining areas or elsewhere.
Finally, in relation to the decorative for the Despotic thrones, it usually followed that on the iconostases, since as a general rule they were created by the same wood sculptors.